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0 79e11 ecdd165a origAmerican troops parade in Vladivostok, Siberia in August 1918.

AEF troops continued fighting in Russia after Armistice on Western Front 

By Chris Isleib
Director of Public Affairs, United States World War One Centennial Commission

Did you know that American troops of the AEF continued fighting LONG AFTER the 11 NOV Armistice? They did so, as part of the AEF's incursion to Russia.

Did you know that there were actually TWO American incursions into Russia? They were separated by thousands of miles, as well as a significantly different mission.

There was a 5,000-member force (the Polar Bears) sent to Archangel, in North Russia, as part of a multi-nation Allied combat/stabilization force. Their story was well-told to us by historian Mike Grobbel, in our October 2017 DISPATCH

https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4652-honoring-detroit-s-own-polar-bear-memorial-association-s-world-war-i-centennial-commemoration.html

Separately, there was also a 3,000 member AEF force (the Wolfhounds) sent to Vladivostok, in far eastern Siberia, to take control of war stockpiles that were originally sent from America, and to protect the trans-Siberian railway.

Each expedition cost hundreds of American lives. Their participants faced enormous hardships -- especially during the harsh Russian winter months. And, their troops continued in combat operations long after the 11 NOV Armistice. The troops from each were among the very last to return to America, after war's end.

The Wolfhounds story is the first segment of a remarkable two-part series written by Gibson Bell Smith, a noted historian, author, and archivist who worked at the U.S. National Archives.

Links to the entire articles can be found here:

Part 1 https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2002/winter/us-army-in-russia-1.html

Part 2 https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2002/winter/us-army-in-russia-2.html

Footnotes for Parts 1 and 2 https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2002/winter/us-army-in-russia-3.html

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