fbpx
transition01.jpg
transition03.jpg
Belvedere-Stone-View-3.jpg
Belvedere-to-Sculpture.jpg
Belvedere-Stone-View-1.jpg
Rendering-2.jpg
Rendering-3A.jpg
Rendering-4.jpg
Rendering-5.jpg
Terrace-Planters2.jpg
_P3_3855_250118-Edit_250118.jpg
_P3_3934_250118_250118.jpg
_P3_3941_250118_250118.jpg
previous arrow
next arrow
maquette0.jpg
maquette2.jpg
overhead.jpg
Belvedere-to-Sculpture.jpg
Rendering-5.jpg
Flagstaff-from-South-Terrace.jpg
sabin3.jpg
sabin2.jpg
sabin12.jpg
wide-shot.jpg
armature-3.jpg
armature-1.jpg
armature-4.jpg
previous arrow
next arrow

Dr. Morses Compound Syrup of Yellow Dock Root Regulating the Liver and Digestive Organs and Purifying the Blood

Quacks, Alternative Medicine, and the U.S. Army in the First World War 

By Evan P. Sullivan
via the Nursing Clio web site

During the First World War, the Surgeon General received numerous pitches for miraculous cures for sick and wounded American soldiers. Ranging from anti-sea sickness remedies to complex elixirs for treating diseases like tuberculosis and venereal disease, America’s “quack” and non-traditional medical practitioners sought a seat at the table. Serving as a barrier between established medical practices and non-professionally tested “cures,” the Army Medical Department and the Surgeon General worked to shield vulnerable ill soldiers from the potential dangers of the medically unknown.

Yet, at the same time, the military debated allowing the use of osteopaths in the ranks and used alternative medical techniques like hydrotherapy and essential oils for wound rehabilitation. This is part of the U.S. Army’s turbulent First World War relationship with alternative medicine.

American institutional medicine was still crystallizing at the turn of the twentieth century. Medical schools in the United States during the mid-to-late nineteenth century lagged behind those in Europe, largely focusing on lecture-learning with little hands on experience. It wasn’t until the first couple decades of the twentieth century that substantial changes took place in the practical education of American doctors, like adopting more rigorous standards, scientific research, hands-on experience, and university-hospital affiliations.

Americans’ confidence in modern medicine didn’t always keep pace with the developments in medical proficiency. Alternative healing methods like herbalism, hydrotherapy, homeopathy, and massage therapy, were a major feature of turn-of-the-century American life.

Read the entire article on the Nursing Clio web site here:

External Web Site Notice: This page contains information directly presented from an external source. The terms and conditions of this page may not be the same as those of this website. Click here to read the full disclaimer notice for external web sites. Thank you.

 

"Pershing" Donors

$5 Million +


Founding Sponsor
PritzkerMML Logo


Starr Foundation Logo


The Lilly Endowment